RSS

Tag Archives: yoghurt

Dahi Bhalla


First off, wish you all a very good new year. I don’t think I can think of a better first post/recipe than the amazing Dahi bhalla. I am not sure how many of you have heard of Dahi bhalla, but I didn’t know of its existence till the new year’s eve of 2012 🙂 A few friends planned to meet and decided on a chaat-themed potluck. Pav-Bhaaji and Pani-Puri were taken and I was wondering what to make; was trying to decide between Aloo tiki-chole and Bhel puri when Google led me to Dahi vada and then, *drumroll*, Dahi bhalla. Now, I know Dahi vada, hindi for Thayir vadai (as far as I know). But, Dahi bhalla? Well, Google again came to my rescue – turns out that the main difference between the two is in the dahi; while for Dahi vada the curd is, well, just sour with some spices for Dahi bhalla the curd is sweet, almost like a lassi. I followed the recipe at Vahrehvah with some minor modifications and result was lip-smacking.

The first step in the preparation of Dahi bhallas is making the Bhallas. Making Bhalla is similar to making Vadai.

Urad dhal 1 cup
Green Chillies 1
Salt 1 tsp (more or less based on your taste)
Potato 1 (medium-size)
Cashew 30-40 broken pieces
Raisins 30-40 pieces
Cooking Oil

Soak urad dhal and green chillies in about 1.5 to 2 cups of water for a few hours (overnight is best, but I soaked it only for ~4 hrs and it did not notice any difference). Grind this to a thick paste adding as little water as possible. Add salt to this mix and beat this mix well with a spoon to aerate the mixture. I picked this tip from the Vahrehvah chef and the Vadas (or Bhallas :)) turned out soft and fluffy.

Boil potato; peel the skin and mash it well. Mix this with the aerated urad dhal mixture. This is the dough for Dahi bhalla.

Note: Instead of deep-frying the Bhallas, I used my Appam pan (looks similar to this). I picked this tip from the jugalbandits a while back; in addition to other benefits listed in the post, I noticed that it was less messy and resulted in uniform Bhallas.

To make the Bhallas, take a bit of the dough in your hand and make a rough ball with it. Now with your thumb, make a shallow hole. Place a piece of cashew and raisin in this hole and close it. Stuffing the Bhallas with cashew & raisin is purely optional, but I would highly recommend this as biting into a cashew/raisin as you are eating the Bhallas takes the taste and the experience to another level.

Add oil to the pan, about a tsp or so in each hole, Place the bhallas and cook both sides by turning them.

Use up all the dough and finish making the bhallas. The yield for 1 cup of urad dhal was about 60 and I guess the number depends on the size/shape of the Bhallas that you make.

If you are not a dahi (curd) fan, you can stop at this point and enjoy the Bhallas with a cup of tea and/or mint & tamarind chutney. K can vouch for that 🙂 Of course, to kick it up a notch, you need to turn them into awesome Dahi bhallas.

Dahi (curd) 3 cups
Sugar 1/2 cup
Cumin powder 2 tsp
Coriander powder 2 tsp
Chaat masala 2 tsp
Sev couple of handful
boondi couple of handful
Coriander 2 tsp (for garnish)
Water few cups

Add water to a deep pan and bring it to a boil. Add the Bhallas in batches to the boiling water, leaving it in for a couple of minutes; take it out and with a napkin press on it gently to squeeze out as much water as you can. Once soaked in hot water the Bhallas become soft and absorbs dahi faster.

Whisk the curd with sugar (add a little water if it is too thick) and keep it ready.

In a wide bottomed container, make a bed with boondi. Place the Bhallas (soaked and squeezed) over this as a single layer. Now pour the sweetened curd and make sure to cover the Bhallas. Use more curd, if need be.

Sprinkle the coriander, cumin powders on top as well as the chaat masala. Complete the garnish with sev and coriander leaves.

May be a little bit more coriander…


Now, it is truly ready…

Dig in and enjoy!

Advertisements
 
15 Comments

Posted by on January 8, 2012 in Desi

 

Tags: , , , ,

Mor kootu

I am a big fan of curd (Indian yogurt) – every desi meal is squared off with a liberal dose of curd at the end, be it idli or pongal or roti. If I refuse to eat a dish, add some curd to it, and chances are I will finish it without any complaint. What are the odds that this curd-eater (or over-eater) would find a guy who doesn’t touch curd with a 10 foott pole? Well, that is what happened; I married someone who doesn’t eat curd, smell curd and prefers to not even see curd 🙂 So my favorite dishes like mor kozhambu and avial are rarely made, as I am too lazy to make two dishes for the two of us. When I have people over for lunch or dinner, however, the rules of the game are different. I don’t think too much about making a dish or two that my husband would skip.

Dakshin by Chandra Padmanabhan has some authentic Tam-Bram recipes and when I looked at her Mor kootu, I knew this was something that could not go wrong. All the goodness of kootu with the tangy taste of curd, this is sure to be a hit in any crowd.
Read the rest of this entry »

 
8 Comments

Posted by on August 17, 2008 in Cooking, Desi, Traditional cooking

 

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Wraps galore

Flatbread with some kind of filling makes a wrap. Flatbreads are found almost in every cuisine in the world and hence wraps come in all sizes and flavors.

They are a good low-carbohydrate alternative to traditional sandwiches. Although, it has been around in Mexican cuisine for over a hundred years, it has become immensely popular in the recent years with the plethora of diets that restricts the carbohydrate intake.

Wraps Galore - 2
Read the rest of this entry »

 
2 Comments

Posted by on January 5, 2008 in Cooking, Desi

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Carrot Cabbage Paratha

My in-laws are leaving for India tomorrow and last time when they had come to the US, I bought for them some awesome home-made chappathis to take on their flight journey. They were made by a Punjabi lady – perks of living in the Bay Area I guess 🙂 They really cherished it, as my MIL did not have to cook right after she landed in India. She could get by a day or two with these chappathis. Fast forward 2 years. My MIL wanted me to buy her some chappathis to eat during travel and afterwards. GOK (for the uninitiated, God Only Knows), where the chappathi-lady is now. How can you say no to a request from your MIL? 😛 Thus started my hunt for finding someone who can make good chappathis.
Read the rest of this entry »

 
1 Comment

Posted by on August 22, 2007 in Cooking, Desi

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Saturday Lunch with Lemon Rice & Avial

As our weekday lunches are usually packed box lunch, we like to have a nice sit-down lunch during the weekend. Well, I said we like to, but we normally don’t 🙂 I am not an early riser and getting early (read 8:00 AM) on weekends is a challenge for me. Unlike me, Elle is an early riser and when we were room-mates (I guess that would be a different post), she would become restless by 9:00 on weekend mornings and force me to wake up. It was indeed nice to have her as a room-mate and I never felt that I was staying away from home. Thanks Elle!
Read the rest of this entry »

 
3 Comments

Posted by on July 28, 2007 in Cooking, Desi, Traditional cooking

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,