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Tag Archives: methi

Methi Malai Matar Paneer

Uff! I know, just reading that is tiring; au contraire, the dish is really easy and quick to prepare and yumilicious to taste. There are some dishes that you grow up with and some are introduced to you through eating out @ restaurants, friend’s houses etc. But this was a recipe, I was introduced through the blog world and I had never tried or tasted this, till I made it. This is a dish that is super easy to prepare, but will taste as though it is a lot complicated with the methi and malai add distinctly different dimensions to it. A perfect party dish!

1 onion
7-8 green chillies
1/2″ ginger
2 cloves of garlic (optional)
1 Tbsp cashews
1/2″ cinnamon

Grind the above ingredients into a smooth paste.

Saute about a cup of cubed paneer in a tsp of oil, till they are golden on all sides. Keep this aside.

Saute the ground paste in a tsp oil, till the paste is rid of raw onion smell. (If you are really sensitive to raw onion smell, boil the onions in water for about 5 mins before you grind it). Now add

1 cup fresh fenugreek (methi) leaves (1/2 cup if you are using kasoori or dried methi leaves)
1 cup fresh or frozen peas

Cook this well for about 10 mins. Add 1/2 cup cream (or whole fat milk) to this boiling mixture and let it simmer for about 10 mins. That is it.

As I said, this is really easy to prepare and tastes well with rotis or parathas.

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Posted by on September 28, 2010 in Cooking, Desi, General

 

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Three ways to Chutney heaven

Chutneys are the Indian equivalent of dips or spreads.  Usually, it contains one main ingredient ground with complimenting spices. There are a few blueprints for making chutneys and once you know this, you can whip up any kind of chutney, by simply switching the main component with something else that you like. In this post, I am going to write about 3 basic ways to make chutney. Once you master these 3 ways, you can replace the methi (Fenugreek) leaves with chayote squash peels, or coriander leaves with mint or any other herb and so on. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on April 14, 2010 in General

 

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Bisi Bele Bath Powder

I have already posted about Bisi Bele Bath as I learnt from my mom. Bisi Bele Bath is a Kannadiga dish, fairly obvious given the Kannada name (Bisi = hot, bele = dhal/lentils). This is a different take on the same recipe, given by a true-blood Kannadiga and gets as authentic as it can. This post is in response to Mag of MagCreations request for this recipe, and what better time to post it than the eve of Ugadi. Happy Ugadi to all of you!
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Posted by on March 11, 2010 in Cooking, Desi, Traditional cooking

 

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Mor kootu

I am a big fan of curd (Indian yogurt) – every desi meal is squared off with a liberal dose of curd at the end, be it idli or pongal or roti. If I refuse to eat a dish, add some curd to it, and chances are I will finish it without any complaint. What are the odds that this curd-eater (or over-eater) would find a guy who doesn’t touch curd with a 10 foott pole? Well, that is what happened; I married someone who doesn’t eat curd, smell curd and prefers to not even see curd 🙂 So my favorite dishes like mor kozhambu and avial are rarely made, as I am too lazy to make two dishes for the two of us. When I have people over for lunch or dinner, however, the rules of the game are different. I don’t think too much about making a dish or two that my husband would skip.

Dakshin by Chandra Padmanabhan has some authentic Tam-Bram recipes and when I looked at her Mor kootu, I knew this was something that could not go wrong. All the goodness of kootu with the tangy taste of curd, this is sure to be a hit in any crowd.
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Posted by on August 17, 2008 in Cooking, Desi, Traditional cooking

 

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