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Tag Archives: cinnamon

Paucity makes the heart grow fonder

Ah! Curry leaves!  I grew up in an independent house(single-family home for those in the U.S.) in Chennai and where we lived coconut & mango trees are common sight.  And so was it in our house. In addition, the house also has a curry tree – yes it is a tree, over 9 feet tall and thriving.  We picked the leaves when we needed it – for tempering (thalippu) or thogayal –  and it couldn’t have gotten fresher than that.  May be it was the easy availability or abundance or the ignorance of youth, I never quite liked these greenies.  I never understood why the elders went gaga over its flavor and was also not taken in by its medicinal value.  The only use (thanks to my mom!) I had for these leaves was when they were boiled with good old coconut oil and massaged onto my hair.  The first time I missed (or rather longed) for these leaves where when I couldn’t find them.  Yes, we always miss what we can’t have and when something gets harder to get, fonder does our heart grow. Such is human nature, I guess!

When SacramentoSpice posted her curry leaf chicken recipe (yes, you read that right!) and linked Manisha’s version, I remembered that I had bookmarked Manisha’s Kadipatta Chicken a while back.  I wanted to try a vegetarian version of this and was toying with the idea of doing it with either cauliflower or potato (paneer would work well too, now that I think of it).  When a dear friend gave me a ziploc full of curry leaves, picked fresh from her parents’ home, the timing could not have been more perfect 🙂  My recipe is very close to Manisha’s version, but am posting it again to record the minor tweaks that I did. Thanks, Manisha! Onto the Kariveppilai potato-cauliflower fry (I couldn’t make up mind I decided to use both potato & cauliflower)!

Spices

1 Tsp oil
1 Tsp black pepper
1 Tsp cinnamon powder
5 cloves
2 red chillies

1 cup Curry leaves, washed & dried
1 Tbsp Tamarind Paste (1/2 golf ball sized piece, if you are using fresh)
1 Tsp turmeric powder
1 onion, chopped fine
1 small tomato, quartered
1/2 cauliflower – chopped into florets
2 medium sized potatos – cubed into 1″ pieces
1 Tsp salt

Saute the spices in a tsp of oil till they are well roasted but not burnt in a saute pan (or kadai). Add the kariveppilai to the spice mixture and saute till the leaves are fried well. Add the chopped onion, quartered tomato and salt, wait for the onion to become translucent.

Let it cool and grind it to a paste along with the tamarind. (Tip: If you want, you can stop right at this stage and use this is a chutney / thogayal to mix with rice or use as a side dish to idli / dosai. If you want to attain kariveppilai nirvana, continue).

Add the cauliflower – potato mixture to the same pot (to keep shy happy), close it with a lid and cook till the veggies are semi-tender.

At this point, add the ground paste and cook till the veggies are fork-tender.  If you want a watery dish, you can add a cup of water at this stage.  But if you are like me and prefer a dry dish, hold the water.

This is a perfect side dish with rice & dhal or with rotis.

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Posted by on October 24, 2010 in Cooking, Desi, Traditional cooking

 

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Methi Malai Matar Paneer

Uff! I know, just reading that is tiring; au contraire, the dish is really easy and quick to prepare and yumilicious to taste. There are some dishes that you grow up with and some are introduced to you through eating out @ restaurants, friend’s houses etc. But this was a recipe, I was introduced through the blog world and I had never tried or tasted this, till I made it. This is a dish that is super easy to prepare, but will taste as though it is a lot complicated with the methi and malai add distinctly different dimensions to it. A perfect party dish!

1 onion
7-8 green chillies
1/2″ ginger
2 cloves of garlic (optional)
1 Tbsp cashews
1/2″ cinnamon

Grind the above ingredients into a smooth paste.

Saute about a cup of cubed paneer in a tsp of oil, till they are golden on all sides. Keep this aside.

Saute the ground paste in a tsp oil, till the paste is rid of raw onion smell. (If you are really sensitive to raw onion smell, boil the onions in water for about 5 mins before you grind it). Now add

1 cup fresh fenugreek (methi) leaves (1/2 cup if you are using kasoori or dried methi leaves)
1 cup fresh or frozen peas

Cook this well for about 10 mins. Add 1/2 cup cream (or whole fat milk) to this boiling mixture and let it simmer for about 10 mins. That is it.

As I said, this is really easy to prepare and tastes well with rotis or parathas.

 
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Posted by on September 28, 2010 in Cooking, Desi, General

 

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Bisi Bele Bath Powder

I have already posted about Bisi Bele Bath as I learnt from my mom. Bisi Bele Bath is a Kannadiga dish, fairly obvious given the Kannada name (Bisi = hot, bele = dhal/lentils). This is a different take on the same recipe, given by a true-blood Kannadiga and gets as authentic as it can. This post is in response to Mag of MagCreations request for this recipe, and what better time to post it than the eve of Ugadi. Happy Ugadi to all of you!
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Posted by on March 11, 2010 in Cooking, Desi, Traditional cooking

 

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Goan Pulao

Goa – I am not sure about you, but the mere name conjures up images of blue sea, clear sky, pristine beaches and everything exotic. When I heard about Goan Pulao from a dear friend of mine, needless to say, I was thinking of everything exotic – exotic spices, flavors, what not. Exotic, rich flavors in this dish makes it stand true to its name but surprisingly these flavors come together to make a very simple, satisfying dish.

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Posted by on March 7, 2010 in Cooking, Desi

 

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Baklava, your honor!

Baklava

My dear blogger-friend UL had requested me to make Baklava and post the recipe here. Making baklava is an easy but patient-demanding and time -consuming procedure. I have made it couple of times before, and I follow the recipe by Gretchen, the instructions here are concise and precise, with additional FAQs. She even has tips on how to cut the Baklava 🙂
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Posted by on March 31, 2008 in Cooking, Mid-Eastern

 

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Afternoon With Strangers err… Foodies

How do you prepare for a lunch and an afternoon with strangers in person but you know them virtually? Will it be a quick luncheon for may be couple of hours with tall promises that we will keep in touch and meet regularly, but heart-in-heart you know that in all probability you will never meet them again? Well, these were some of the questions / thoughts that I was pondering on the morning of 16th February 2008, the day when the Bay Area Food bloggers decided to meet and eat, as said by The Cooker. In fact, what to cook was the easy part for me, thanks to Shankari – the organizer of the meet who sadly couldn’t make it. Well there was just one very simple rule for this event (similar to the very many blog events :)); the dish should be selected from one of the fellow Bay Area blogger.

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Posted by on February 21, 2008 in Cooking, Desi

 

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Spicy yet sweet…

Or should I say sweet yet spicy…

Mango Chutney

M is a dear friend of mine and her mom was visiting her recently. Whenever all of us meet, we have some interesting conversations and never run out of topics to discuss, and of course, there is always food. Food is in plenty with her around and she loves to feed – she would constantly be trying out something new, either a new recipe or a gadget. I have picked up quite a few recipes/tricks from her. Thanks mami!
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Posted by on January 24, 2008 in Cooking, Desi

 

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